Prizes and Awards

The Actuaries Institute offers a number of prizes recognising achievements in actuarial research.

A M Parker Prize

The A M Parker Prize is awarded each year to the most outstanding paper published by the Institute in the Australian Actuarial Journal or presented to a conference run by or on behalf of the Institute.

H M Jackson Prize

The H M Jackson Prize is awarded each year to the most outstanding paper published by, or presented to, a body other than the Institute.

The Melville Prize

The Actuaries Institute Melville Prize is awarded each year to to the most outstanding published work by a member of, or relevant to, the Australian actuarial profession.

Established in 1977 from the generous donations of the late Tig Melville, the Melville Prize is awarded biennially and consists of a certificate and monetary award.

Prize winners are determined by the Prizes Committee, a sub-committee of the Research Council Committee.


Tig Melville
1926-2010

The Convention Prize

The Actuaries Institute Convention Prize is awarded each year to an outstanding paper presented at either the Actuaries Summit or the Financial Services Forum.

Following the event, a shortlist is put forward by the events organising committee and prize winners are determined by the Prizes Committee, a sub-committee of the Research Council Committee.

The Conventions Prize consists of a certificate and monetary award.

The Taylor Fry Gold and Silver Prizes

Taylor Fry may award a Silver or Gold prize for an outstanding paper presented at either the Injury Schemes Seminar or the General Insurance Seminar.

The Silver Award may be made to the author(s) of a paper considered by the judging panel to have:

  • effected significant advance in the profession's understanding or knowledge of a specific subject or sphere of knowledge or;
  • collected or presented existing material in such a way as to raise the awareness of the profession regarding an important contemporary issue.

The Gold Award may be made to the author(s) of a paper considered by the judging panel to have achieved:

  • quality sufficient for the Silver Award;
  • significant theoretical, methodological, or analytical advance.

The analytical advance need not be completely original but, if not, should be novel to the actuarial mainstream.

The judging panel may award a prize only if the subject paper is considered sufficiently meritorious. It need not make any award in relation to a particular seminar.